recipe ideas

bok choy, collards, greens, kale, recipe ideas, recipes, tatsoi, turnips

Glorious Greens! – They sure are pretty, but what do I do with them?


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So, the fall and winter seasons bring us lots of greens and lots of root vegetables. If you don’t know what to do with them – and they’re really quite versatile and easy to put in just about everything – they can pile up on you and make you feel like your bounty is a chore. This is the last thing we want folks to feel about their weekly produce shares, so I’m getting on the ball and getting to some of the recipes I find useful and inspirational. But I do need to let you know, that once you begin on the greens journey, you’ll realize how extremely easy cooking and eating greens can be – and it’s tasty and nutritious too!

Ben told me that a number of folks were asking about tatsoi and what to do with it, so I’ll begin with it. Those green beauties to the left are tatsoi. Mark Bittman, author of Leafy Greens: An A-to-Z Guide of 30 Types of Greens Plus More Than 120 Delicious Recipes, breaks down the Asian greens (he refers to them as “Chinese cabbages”) (21-22):

Nutritional information: High in beta carotene, vitamin C, potassium, some B vitamins, and fiber.  To cook: Heading cabbages can be treated much like green or red cabbage; bok choi can be used like chard. All Chinese cabbages are good in stir-fries and soups; braised, with or without meat; pickled (as in kimchee). Young Chinese cabbages, or the tatsoi variety, are excellent in salads. Substitutes: For bok choi, chard, which is close enough for most purposes; for the heading cabbages, common head cabbage; for tatsoi, young mustard, arugula, or cress.

Now, let me just tell you that you will figure out that you can substiute tatsoi for a lot of other things than Mark suggests above. I think it’s a great substitute for spinach as well. I think the best way to figure out what you’d like to do with your greens is to try them raw and to try them braised with a little salt and pepper. Once you taste them in these two purist forms, you can decide on what types of flavors your palate is comfortable combining them with. Just to give you an idea of how easy it is to eat greens, I’ll tell you what I did for breakfast this morning. First, I chopped up the turnip roots into diced pieces (two bunches worth). I let them simmer on low in a dollop of butter and a sprinkle of salt. As those simmered, I chopped the turnip greens and then added them to the pan. Then I placed a lid over the pan so the veggie juices would help cook the turnip roots and the greens (and it’s always good to salt your greens as you place them in the pan – it helps wilt them and it disperses the salt more evenly when they’re uncooked vs. cooked and bunched). In the meantime, I then chopped up one head of tatsoi and added it to the pan. Like spinach, it takes up a lot of pan space at first but then it wilts down quite a bit. I then put the lid back on the pan (this is a medium-sized typical frying pan – all metal). I then chopped up one head of bok choi. Okay – hold on. So, what’s the count so far? Right now, we have two bunches of turnips, one head of tatsoi, one head of bok choi and a small dollop of butter. That sounds like A LOT of greens, and I suppose it is, but it really all does wilt down to a manageable bunch of greens. Okay, so back to the pan. Basically, I added all of the chopped greens in increments, so they all had time to wilt. Once all the greens were sufficiently wilted, I added 4 whisked eggs into the pan. I then let those eggs cook for about 4 minutes on low. In the meantime, I got out the block of sharp, white cheddar cheese and grated it over the top of the eggs. Finally, I turned the oven on to 350 degrees and placed the entire pan in the oven. I am a terrible omelet maker, so I do my egg omelets, fritata style (it sounds fancy, but it’s really just a lazy person’s omelet as far as I’m concerned). To be honest, I’m not sure how long those eggs were in the oven – somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes. The goal, of course, is to make sure you cooked it long enough to cook the eggs through (unless you like your eggs a bit wet, in which case, I suppose that’s not your goal…). Anyway, you should be able to see whether the eggs are cooked to your liking. If the visuals are uncertain, you can always just poke at them to feel their texture – but don’t burn yourself! Once the dish is cooked to your satisfaction, take it out of the oven and scoop some out, add a little salt and pepper (or any condiments you usually eat with your eggs – I’m a fan of hot sauce, but I know some folks really like ketchup on their eggs) and enjoy! 🙂 Whew! That sure does sounds like a lot of work (and food – but there are not usually any left overs in our house, but when there are we just reheat them for lunch or the following morning’s breakfast) when I look at what I typed, but the whole process takes me less than 20 minutes and I listen to the news on NPR and drink my morning coffee as I cook. I also make the chickens’ breakfasts as I prep our food. They like pretty much every vegetable we chop up and give them (all but eggplant, peppers, and onions), so it’s nice to feed them the things I would normally toss in the compost bin.

Okay, so that’s one idea :). I’ll leave you with some other recipes, written by the experts who aren’t nearly as long winded as myself. These recipes call for particular greens, but you can substitute them for others. I use tatsoi and spinach interchangeably. I even cooked chopped turnips and greens and bok choi and put them in a white sauce lasagna for our CSA potluck/Oktoberfeast. It was a hit and I don’t think anyone realized they were eating something so “exotic” as Asian greens in their lasagna :).

Spinach and Egg Soup (Bittman 1995: 67)
1 pound spinach (I would also use kale, tat soi, beet greens or turnip greens for this recipe – or even a combination of greens)
2 tablespoons butter
salt and freshly ground black pepper
dash of freshly grated nutmeg
5 to 6 cups of good chicken stock (my note: you can certainly substitute vegetable stock)
2 eggs
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan

1. Steam or parboil the spinach until it wilts. Cool it under cold water, squeeze it dry, and chop.
2. Melt the butter in a 4- to 6-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the spinach, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Add the stock and bring it to a gentle simmer. Beat the eggs with half the Parmesan and add them to the soup. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the eggs are cooked and soup is thick. Serve with break, passing the remaining Parmesan at the table.

Turnip Greens with Potatoes (Bittman 1995: 110)

2 tablespons peanut or vegetable oil (I use sesame oil)
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1 pound turnip greens
2 small red potatoes, about 1/2 pound, washed well and peeled if desired, cut into 1/2 inch dice
1/2 cup chicken or vegetable stock or water
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 teasppon rise or wine vinegar

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until it begins to color; add the remaining spice and cook, stirring, until the mixture is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the turnip greens, the potatoes, and the stock or water, stir, cover, and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook, checking and stirring every 3 or 4 minutes, until the potato is tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Raise the heat to high and boil off excess liquid, if any. Season to taste, drizzle with vinegar, and serve immediately.

You can also use collards, cress, dandelions, kale, mizuna, mustard, tatsoi or bok choi. I usually decide on what to use depending on, first, what we have and need to use and second, depending on what I flavors I want in my meal. A lot of times, I just throw all the greens together, since we almost always wind up taking at least a few greens back home from the CSA drop or from market  – even after donating to the Interfaith Food Shuttle.

Well, hopefully I’ve given y’all some ideas for how to start using your greens. If you have favorite things to do with your greens, please feel free to post your recipes or send them my way via e-mail at parker.patricia@gmail.com.

Also, please do check out the links at the right side of the page under the heading “labels”. There are a number of recipes and I tried to always label what was used in those recipes, so they’d be easy to search.

basil, eggplant, recipe ideas, recipes, red onions, spaghetti, summer squash, tomatoes

Ben’s Produce Summer Spaghetti


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Ingredients
1 summer squash
1 Japanese eggplant
2 small red onions
3 tomatoes
fresh basil sprigs
1 tablespoon olive oil
8-16 ounces cooked pasta
shredded Parmesan
salt, pepper, garlic (diced)
1 pound ground beef from Smith Angus Farm

Preparation
1. Dice tomatoes. Reserve about half for garnish.
2. Chop, slice or dice remaining vegetables (with peels on).
3. Brown beef with onions and garlic (or just onions and garlic with oil if you’re not using beef).
4. Add vegetables (eggplant first); let cook until tender.
5. Toss sauce and pasta. Add salt, pepper, raw diced tomato and fresh chopped basil as garnish.

ENJOY!

basil, bell peppers, recipe ideas, recipes, summer squash, tomatoes

you say tomato…i say YUM!


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Hi everyone out there in cyberspace (wow – remember when that term was used regularly?!). I hope you’re having a fabulous summer and keeping as cool as you can. We’re still sporting our multi-bandanna stylee and drinking lots and lots of water to keep hydrated. Life is good – and it would be even better if it would only rain! Yesterday I drove from Chattanooga back to Raleigh. The rain followed me the whole way…well, not the whole way – it followed me until about Durham and then it just stopped. We managed to get a few sprinkles but we didn’t get much. The bright side though was that it was our friend Josh’s 4th birthday yesterday and he wanted fireworks to celebrate. The rain would have put a damper on a very cute and funny little boy’s birthday – so I guess we can’t be too upset about its absence ;).

So, I realized I haven’t posted many recipes lately (or posted much all summer actually)…so I’m going to use the rest of this blog for exactly that. Right now we have tomatoes, summer squash, onions, potatoes, purple peppers, cucumbers, basil, and a few melons and eggplant (more of those to come soon). As usual, please feel free to post your own recipes to the comment box below or e-mail them to me at parker.patricia@gmail.com. We would love it if you shared some of your recipes with us!

Okay – moving on…

Here’s a basic summer spaghetti recipe. Our CSA members are receiving a TON of tomatoes this week – and even though they’re amazing all by themselves, I figured some of you might want a little more variety in your lives – especially as you continue to get more and more of them. I found this recipe on a blog called Closet Cooking. You can access the link to the recipe here. It’s easy and tasty – you can’t go wrong. Of course, vary according to taste and what you happen to have in your kitchen/garden.

Ingredients:
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 clove garlic (chopped)
1 serving pasta (cooked)
2 roma tomatoes (chopped)
1 tablespoon basil (chopped)
1 tablespoon parsley (chopped)
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Heat the oil in a pan.
2. Saute the garlic until fragrant, about 30-60 seconds.
3. Turn off the heat.
4. Add the pasta, tomatoes, basil, parsley, salt and pepper and toss to mix.

This one came from Southern Living (here). You can get peaches at the Western Wake Farmer’s Market from Clayton Orchard. This is another simple one – but feels and looks like it came from a fancy schmancy gormet restaurant.

 Ingredients:

  • 1/3  cup  white balsamic vinegar
  • 1  garlic clove, minced
  • 2  tablespoons  brown sugar
  • 1/4  teaspoon  freshly ground pepper
  • 1/8  teaspoon  salt
  • 2  tablespoons  olive oil
  • 1  large peach, chopped
  • 1 1/2  tablespoons  chopped fresh basil

Preparation:

1. Whisk together first 5 ingredients until sugar is dissolved. Whisk in olive oil. Stir in chopped peach and basil. Serve immediately.

This one calls for tomatoes and squash – it’s a tomato and squash gratin. You can access the original link here.

Ingredients:

5-6 summer squash, sliced thin lengthwise
3-4 large heirloom or large, red tomatoes, sliced thin
1/3-1/2 cup olive oil
15-20 whole basil leaves
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Breadcrumbs
Salt & pepper to taste

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400 F.

Place one layer of sliced squash in the bottom of a 9 x 13 inch baking dish. Top with a layer of sliced tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper and a few basil leaves. Generously drizzle olive oil over all and sprinkle a little Parmesan cheese on top. Repeat in the same order until you run out of vegetables. Top layer should be tomatoes.

Add a final toss of Parmesan and a generous coating of breadcrumbs and more olive oil. Bake until everything is soft, bubbly and brown on top (about 30-40 minutes) Serve as a side dish with whatever you’re grilling or with a bean salad or pasta dish for a complete meal.
 This one’s called “Mom’s Summer Squash” and it’s from Simply Recipes. You can access the original posting here.

 Ingredients:
2 lbs squash and/or zucchini, sliced
1 green bell pepper, seeds removed, sliced
2 smallish tomatoes or one large tomato, peeled and cut into wedges
1/2 yellow onion, peeled and sliced
1 clove of garlic, chopped
Olive oil
5 or 6 slices of cheese – jack or cheddar
Basil, either dry or chopped fresh
Salt and pepper

Preparation:  

1 Put onion, garlic, squash, bell pepper into a large saucepan with a couple of tablespoons of olive oil. Put on high heat and brown the vegetables slightly to develop flavor. As you are browning, sprinkle either dried basil or chopped fresh basil on the vegetables. When vegetables are slightly browned, remove from heat, add the slices of cheese, and cover the pan.

2 In a separate stick-free fry pan, put the tomatoes and cook at medium hi heat for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. You want to let the juice from the tomatoes evaporate some. After 5 minutes, add the tomatoes to the rest of the vegetables and stir. Salt and pepper to taste.
Serves 4.

This one’s a variation on the classic BLT – it’s a BTB (bacon, tomato and basil). This recipe is from Southern Living and you can access the original posting here

Ingredients

  • 9  slices ready-to-serve bacon, halved
  • 1/2  cup  shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/3  cup  mayonnaise
  • 1  garlic clove, minced
  • 9  slices extra-thin white bread slices
  • 3  plum tomatoes, sliced
  • 12  fresh basil leaves

Preparation

1. Heat bacon according to package directions until crisp.
2. Stir together cheese, mayonnaise, and garlic. Spread mayonnaise mixture evenly onto 1 side of each bread slice. Layer 3 bread slices, mayonnaise sides up, with 3 bacon slices each. Top bacon evenly with 1 bread slice, tomato slices, and basil. Top each with remaining bread slices, mayonnaise sides down. Cut each sandwich into quarters.

You can also access recipes for tomato pie (amazing!), tomato grits, and my mom’s cucumber salad on this blog (an old posting) here. a;lsdkfj

Alrighty – hope y’all try out some or all of these recipes and enjoy ’em.

As usual, thanks for stopping by!

bok choy, cabbage, green onions, recipe ideas, tatsoi

tat soi and kale and spinach oh my!


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This is tat soi

It’s a lot like bok choy – it’s an Asian green and you can treat it as you would bok choy.

Here are a few recipes you can use for both (from Farm Fresh Recipes):

Bok Choy (or Tat Soi) Stir Fry

(Makes 4 servings)

2 Tbsp soy sauce
2 Tbsp water
2 tsp sugar
1 Tbsp canola oil
1 tsp sesame oil
1 bunch bok choi or tat soi
4 green onions, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
Crushed red pepper flakes
2 Tbsp coarsely chopped peanutes
Rice (amount and type are up to you)

1. In a small bowl, miz soy sauce, water and sugar; set aside. 
2. Cut bok choy ribs and leaves crosswise into 2-inch pieces. 
3. In a wok or large, deep skillet, heat canola and sesame oils over medium-high heat. Add bok choy (or tat soi), green onions, garlic, soy sauce mixture and pepper flakes to taste. Stir-fry just until bok choy (or tat soi) is wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in peanuts and serve immediately over steamed rice.  

Bok Choy (or Tat Soi) Salad

(makes 8 servings)

1/2 c red wine vinegar
1/2 c olive oil
1/2 c sugar
1 Tbsp soy sauce
1/4 c margarine
1/4 c slivered almonds
1/4 c sesame seeds
2 (3 ounce) packages ramen noodles
1 medium head bok choy (or tat soi)
3 green onions

1. In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, oil, sugar and soy sauce until sugar dissolves. Set aside. 
2. Melt margarine in small skillet. Crush the ramen noodles while still in their packaging. Discard seasoning packet (or reuse later for broth) and add noodles to the margarine along with almonds and sesame seeds. Saute until golden brown. Remove from heat and drain on paper towel. 
3. Chop the bok choy (or tat soi) and green onions. Place in large bowl. Add noodle mixture and dressing; toss and serve at once. 


We also offered kale this week (Red Russian kale, to be exact). This is what it looks like: 



I also have a few more kale recipes to share (but you can find others in the blog as well by clicking on “recipe ideas” to the right of the screen). 


Spring Greens Risotto

(Makes 6 servings)

3 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 c chopped green onions
1 1/2 c Arborio rice
1/2 tsp salt
4 c hot vegetable or chicken broth, divided
4 c coarsely chopped spring greens (spinach, chard, sorrel, kale, bok choi, tat soi, etc. – any combo will do – use what you have or what you like)
1/4 tsp grated nutmeg (optional)
1/2 grated Parmesan cheese

1. Heat oil in heavy pot over medium-high heat. Add onions; cook 3 minutes. Add rice and salt. Cook and stir until rice begins to color. 
2. Add 1/2 c broth; cook and stir until most of the broth is absorbed. Add 1 1/2 c broth; simmer, stirring occasionally, until mostly absorbed, about 10 minutes. Add remaining broth. Simmer 20 minutes. Stirring occasionally. 
3. Place greens on top of rice. Cover and simmer 3 minutes. Stir in greens. Simmer and stir a few minutes more until broth is absorbed and rice is tender but moist. 
4. Remove from heat. Stir in Parmesan and serve. 

Portuguese Kale Stew

(Makes 6 servings)

1/2 lb chorizo sausage, thinly sliced
2 (16 oz) cans great northern beans
1 medium head cabbage (or you can substitute tat soi), chopped
2 bunches kale, stemmed and chopped
5 potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 qt water, approximately
Salt and pepper to taste

1. In a large pot, lightly brown sausage. 
2. Add beans, cabbage (or tat soi), kale, potatoes and enough water to cover.    
3. Bring to boil. Reduce heat, and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.  

Okay folks – that’s it for now. We hope you enjoy your yummy produce and thank y’all for stopping by! 

Patricia & Ben  

green onions, recipe ideas, spinach

Chilled Garden Soup for those Sweltering Days


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Hi y’all! I hope everyone is having a fantastic week so far. Things are going well for us. Ben and I are both immensely busy – Ben with planting, me with writing. We are also moving to the farm at the end of this month, so we’ve got to find time to pack and move somewhere in there :). It will be so nice to be living right out on the farm. Right now we live a couple miles from downtown Raleigh – and while we’ll miss our neighbors, I know Ben won’t miss the commute. Charlie Parker (our dog) will be thrilled to be somewhere where he can roam more freely as well. He is a country/farm dog at heart. Probably the thing I’ve missed most since we’ve been living in Raleigh is the stars. They are sometimes visible from here – but it’s nothing compared to a nice, dark country night sky. I can’t wait! 
Ben has gotten the first round of tomatoes in the ground – and eggplant and peppers are next this week. Also, the sugar snap peas are trellised and blooming. It won’t be long before we have some tasty sugar snap peas to offer for CSA members and market. 
Please remember to send me your information if you’re interested in participating in the “getting to know each other” activity. I’ve received a few responses, but I’ll wait to post anything until I get a few more. Again, you can send your info and a picture (or multiple pictures) of yourself, your family, your pets, or anything else to parker.patricia@gmail.com. 
I’d like to share a recipe with folks. It was in the nineties yesterday, so I thought  chilled soup might be appropriate :). I haven’t tried it yet, but I will be doing so soon. This recipe calls for green onions and spinach (among a few other things you’ll want to pick up from other farmers at market – or the grocery store). It’s from Farm Fresh Recipes by Janet Majure. 
Chilled Garden Soup
 
Makes 8 servings. 
1 bunch green onions
2 Tbsp butter
4 cups peeled, diced cucumbers
3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
1 cup chopped spinach (although I’m planning on using more)
1/2 cup peeled, sliced potatoes
Ground black pepper, to taste
1 cup heavy cream, approximately
Fresh lemon juice
Salt
Cucumber slices for garnish
1. In a saucepan over medium-high heat, saute green onions in butter until soft, 3-5 minutes. 
2. Add cucumbers, broth, spinach, potatoes and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, covered, until potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes. 
3. Puree is blender, working in batches. Transfer to bowl and stir in almost enough cream to reach desired consistency. Add lemon and salt to taste. 
4. Chill several hours. Serve with thinly sliced cucumber and garnish (or garnish with cream as in the picture). 
Well, that’s it for now. See you soon! 
Thanks for stopping by.
Patricia & Ben
kale, recipe ideas

Kale


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If kale is new to you, here are a few yummy recipes. I LOVE kale. I could eat it everyday. I throw it in soups and I often just saute it. Hopefully these recipes will help get the creative juices going.



From Food Network:
Sauteed Kale Bobby Flay

 
Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds young kale, stems and leaves coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, finely sliced (you can also substitute green garlic instead)
1/2 cup vegetable stock or water
Salt and pepper
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

Directions

Heat olive oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and
cook until soft, but not colored. Raise heat to high, add the stock and kale and toss to combine. Cover and
cook for 5 minutes. Remove cover and continue to cook, stirring until all the liquid has evaporated. Season
with salt and pepper to taste and add vinegar.

Asian-Style Kale

The Washington Post, October 4, 2006

  • • Cuisine: Asian
  • • Course: Side Dish
  • • Features: Fast, Healthy, Meatless

Summary:

This recipe is from Robyn Webb, a cooking instructor, who says she is particularly fond of using dino kale, but any kind can be substituted here. Serve this dish with marinated, grilled chicken and either steamed brown rice or cooked udon or soba noodles.
3 to 4 servings

Ingredients:
  • • 3/4 pound (1 large bunch) kale*
  • • 2 to 3 teaspoons sesame oil
  • • 1 small shallot, minced
  • • 1 to 2 clove garlic, minced
  • • 1/4 cup (2 thin) minced scallions, both white and light green parts
  • • 1 teaspoon finely grated ginger root
  • • 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds*, for garnish
Directions:

Wash the kale thoroughly to remove all grit. Discard the tough ribs, and coarsely chop the kale leaves.
In a large skillet or heavy wok, heat the sesame oil over medium heat. Add the shallot, garlic, scallions and ginger root and cook for about 1 minute to release the aromas. Add the kale a bunch at a time and cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until the leaves have softened a bit but the kale retains its shape. Remove from heat and add the soy sauce. Divide among individual plates, sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds, if using, and serve hot.
ABOUT COOKED KALE: Some people like their greens on the softer side. For this recipe, author Robyn Webb suggests two techniques to achieve that result:
After the 3 to 4 minutes’ cooking time (but before the soy sauce is mixed in), add water, cover and let steam to desired texture. Continue the recipe with the soy sauce step as stated in the recipe directions.
The kale can first be plunged into boiling water and cooked for 3 to 4 minutes, then drained. Proceed with cooking the shallots and then add the kale as stated in the recipe directions.
NOTE: To toast sesame seeds: Heat them in a dry skillet over medium heat or in a 325-degree oven, shaking the pan frequently, until lightly browned and fragrant, 4 to 8 minutes. Watch carefully; they burn easily.

Recipe Source:

Adapted from Northern Virginia cooking instructor Robyn Webb.
67 calories, 4g fat, 1g saturated fat, n/a cholesterol, 174mg sodium, 7g carbohydrates, 2g dietary fiber, n/a sugar, 3g protein.

Tested by Bonnie S. Benwick for The Washington Post.
E-mail the Food Section at food@washpost.com with recipe questions.
 
 

 Ingredients

  • 12  cups  water
  • 1  bunch kale, trimmed (about 4 ounces)
  • 2 2/3  cups  (1-inch) cubed Yukon gold or red potato (about 1 pound)
  • 3/4  teaspoon  salt, divided
  • 1  tablespoon  olive oil
  • 1  tablespoon  butter or stick margarine
  • 3  cups  diced onion
  • 2  tablespoons  chopped fresh sage
  • 1/4  cup  sliced green onions
  • 1/4  teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper
  • Cooking spray
  • Sage sprigs (optional)

Preparation

Bring water to a boil in a Dutch oven; add kale. Cover and cook over medium heat 5 minutes or until tender. Remove kale with a slotted spoon, reserving cooking liquid. Chop kale and set aside.
Add potato to reserved cooking liquid in pan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until tender. Drain; partially mash potatoes. Stir in kale and 1/4 teaspoon salt.
Preheat oven to 400°.
Heat oil and butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt, diced onion, and chopped sage. Cook 13 minutes or until browned. Combine potato mixture, onion mixture, green onions, and pepper. Remove from heat; cool slightly. Divide potato mixture into 8 equal portions, shaping each into a 1/2-inch-thick patty. Place patties on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400° for 20 minutes.
Preheat broiler.
Broil patties for 5 minutes or until browned. Garnish with sage sprigs, if desired.

 Baked Kale Chips 
(we haven’t had these yet – but a TON of people we’ve talked to have and they LOVE them)

Ingredients:
1 bunch kale
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
Directions:
1. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a non insulated cookie sheet with parchment paper.
2. With a knife or kitchen shears carefully remove the leaves from the thick stems and tear into bite size pieces. Wash and thoroughly dry kale with a salad spinner. Drizzle kale with olive oil and sprinkle with seasoning salt.
3. Bake until the edges brown but are not burnt, 10 to 15 minutes.          
 

This fast stew retains the great charred flavor of the greens, and is much more substantial than a side dish. It also amplifies the taste of the classic combination of collards cooked with salt pork or smoky bacon.

 
 
 

Kale, Sausage and Mushroom Stew

Yield 4 servings
Time 30 to 40 minutes
Mark Bittman

Summary
I like to start with pork sausage, but you can use bits of pork if you like, or a turkey or chicken sausage. Mushrooms cooked in the pan after the sausage make a great garnish for the stew, and so would grated or shaved Parmesan. But the key ingredients are garlic, lots of it, and hot red pepper. Paprika or crushed red chili flakes are fine, but even better is the smoked Spanish paprika called pimentón de la vera, or dried crushed Urfa or Maras peppers from Turkey.
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 to 1 pound Italian sausage, sweet or hot, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 poundrn kale, leaves stripped from stems, stems reserved
  • 3/4 pound trimmed and sliced mushrooms
  • 1 tablespoon roughly chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon hot paprika or dried red chili flakes, or to taste
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 cups chicken stock or water
Method
  • 1. Put olive oil in large deep skillet or casserole, and turn heat to medium-high; a minute later, add sausage and cook without stirring until well browned on one side, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile, chop kale stems into 1/2-inch lengths and shred leaves.
  • 2. Stir sausage and let it brown a bit more. Remove it with a slotted spoon (don’t worry if it isn’t cooked through). Cook mushrooms in remaining fat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and keep warm.
  • 3. Add kale stems and cook, stirring frequently, until they begin to brown, in 3 or 4 minutes. Turn heat to medium and add garlic, paprika or chili flakes, kale leaves, salt and pepper; stir and cook about 1 minute. Return sausage to pan and add stock or water. Raise heat to high and cook about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally and scraping bottom of pan with wooden spoon. Add salt and pepper to taste, ladle stew into bowls and top with reserved mushrooms.
Source: The New York Times

green garlic, recipe ideas

Green Garlic


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If you’re like me, you’re a huge garlic fan, but you’re wondering what the heck to do with green garlic.

Just in case you didn’t know exactly what to do either –  I looked up some green garlic recipes and I found this site (http://www.mariquita.com/recipes/green.garlic.htm) Hope this helps 🙂  –> 

Simplest way to use green garlic: substitute for regular garlic, I chop it up like a green onion, then I use it sparingly raw, and abundantly cooked. The beginning of a soup, hummus or egg salad, thrown in with the onions at the beginning of many dishes that start with ‘cook the chopped onions in oil or butter…” -Julia
Braised Chicken with Green Garlic
from Weir Cooking in the City by Joanne Weir

1 large chicken (about 4 pounds)
2 T butter
2 T olive oil
S and P
1 cup water
3-5 stalks green garlic, trimmed and cleaned as you would a leek, and chopped
1 1/4 cups white wine
1 1/2 cups chicken stock
Remove the wings from the chicken and discard. Cut the chicken into 8 pieces, each breast half cut crosswise into 2 pieces, 2 thighs, and 2 drumsticks.
Melt the butter in the olive oil in a large skillet over med-high heat. Working in batches if necessary, add the chicken, season with S and P, and cook until golden brown on one side, 6-8 minutes. Turn the chicken pieces and cook unti lgolden brown on the second side, another 6-8 minutes. Transfer chicken to aplatter; cover with foil, and keep warm. Pour the excess fat from the pan and discard.
Reduce the heat to medium, add the water and garlic, and cook until the garlic is soft and the water has almost evaporated, about 10 minutes. Add more water during cooking if necessary. Puree in a blender on high speed until very smooth; reserve.
Return the chicken to the pan and increase the heat to high. Add the white wine, chicken stock, and garlic paste and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover , and simmer until the chicken can be easily skewered, 20-25 minutes. Season with S & P.
Transfer the chicken to a platter and cover with foil. Over high heat, reduce the sauce until slightly thickened. Pour the sauce over the chicken and serve.
Serves 6.

Green Garlic Scrambled Egg Toasts
recipe by Martin Bournhonesque
  • 1 stalk green garlic for every 3 eggs (use brown ones for more eggy flavor).
  • butter
  • milk or cream
  • dense wheat bread or levain

Chop green garlic like you would a scallion. Feel free to use all the green part as well as the white part. Beat eggs and add 2 tablespoons milk or cream to eggs. Slice bread thinly and leave near toaster.
Saute green garlic in desired amount of butter over medium flame for a minute or two. Add beaten egg mixture to pan and reduce flame to its lowest possible setting. Stir constantly. As the eggs heat up they will start to steam a little and maybe stick to the bottom of the pan. Add some salt and pepper. Take the pan off direct heat to slow the process down. . The longer it takes, the better it’ll taste. It should take at least 10 minutes to cook 3-5 eggs this way. Throw the bread in the toaster. As the eggs finally congeal, spoon onto toast, and cut to desired size.

Green Garlic Mayonnaise
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon or a little less dijon mustard
  • 4 stalks green garlic, cleaned as you would leeks, white and pale green parts chopped roughly
  • 3 teaspoons lemon juice or rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons more rice or white wine vinegar
  • 1 1/4 cups corn or other vegetable oil

Whirl all ingredients except oil in food processor with the metal blade. With machine running, add oil in thin steady stream through opening until all oil is completely incorporated. If the food pusher has that little hole, use it by pouring the oil into that, it works great.

Green Garlic Soup
The following soup is based on my ‘make any kind of vegetable soup’ recipe, here’s it’s green garlic and potatoes. – Julia
  • 1 pound green garlic
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 Tablespoons cooking oil
  • 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 1/2 quarts broth (chicken or veggie)

Discard the darkest green leafy parts of the green garlic, leaving the white and pale and medium green parts. Cut each garlic in half lengthwise, then mince.
Melt the butter and oil in a large saucepan over moderate heat. Add the minced garlic and saute for about 5 minutes to soften. Add potatoes, season with salt and pepper, then add chicken broth. Bring to a simmer, cover and adjust heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until potatoes are tender enough to mash with a wooden spoon, about 25-35 minutes.
Mash the potatoes into the broth, or puree in a food processor, then reheat. Taste and adjust seasoning before serving.
Serves 6
Raw Green Garlic Uses: mince and add to salads, pound into a paste to make green garlic aioli, use in salad dressings, sprinkle onto any creation using bread or noodles with cheese
Cooked Green Garlic Uses: Poach the last 4″ of the tips and dress with a mustard vinaigrette, dice and saute the tender portions and add to an omelet or frittata, chop and add to stir frys, chop and add to soup.

Green Garlic Soup Au Gratin
8 Stalks Green Garlic
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Butter
2 Tablespoons Butter, plus 2 teaspoons Butter
8 sl Day-old Bread
1 1/4 c chicken or vegetable Broth
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1/2 c Parmesan Cheese, grated

Remove and discard upper third of garlic stalks; (green leaf ends) thinly slice bulb. Heat olive oil and 1 T butter until beginning to foam. Add garlic; saute 1-2 minutes. Reduce heat, cover tightly, and cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Spread bread with 2 T butter; oven toast until lightly golden. Add broth to garlic, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Ladle into 2 oven-proof serving bowls; cover with toasted bread and top with cheese. Dot each with a teaspoon of butter. Bake at 450F for 10 minutes, until cheese has melted and begun to turn golden.

recipe ideas, recipes, snow, stir fry

More snow!!!


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Hello all,



Not much to report this week. More snow and cold. Winter is here to stay and it looks like we may be delayed planting our carrots and peas…On Friday morning I was at Logan Trading Company buying a packet of cabbage seed and was discussing the weather with a clerk. She told me the store records showed the same date last year, February 12th, had a daily high temperature of 70 F! Daytime highs in the low 40’s and nighttime lows in the low 20’s is colder than usual for February. In the NC Piedmont it is recommended to start planting brassica’s, carrots and peas February 1st! It is way too cold for that, so we’ll have to wait for it to warm up. The year has barely started and the weather is not cooperating. What else could I expect but the weather not to cooperate. It rarely ever does and not for long either. The joys of farming!!! But as Henri Alban-Fournier said, “Life on a farm is a school of patience; you can’t hurry the crops or make an ox in two days.”

This coming Tuesday, February 16th, we plan to have produce pickup at our house, 604 Sasser St., between 4:00 to 7:30 pm. The next NCSU delivery will be Wednesday, February 17th. Remember to have your orders placed by Monday evening.

During these cold winter months, please be aware the weather may postpone our harvest of your produce. In response to this, we may postpone pickups by a day or two. We will provide primary notice of pickup changes via email (especially for those of you who place orders) as well as via blog and online store. Thank you for being flexible with us!

Purchase of vegetables is made through our online store-
http://www.vendio.com/stores/bensproduce.

Current vegetable availability includes:
baby beets
bok choy
brussels sprouts
cabbage
carrots
Chinese cabbage
collards
scallions
lettuce
sweet potatoes
tatsoi
Vitamin Green (a mild Asian leafy green)

No longer offered:
broccoli
kale
mixed greens
mustard greens
radishes
spinach
swiss chard
turnips

Future winter vegetables may include:
arugula
broccoli raab
mixed baby lettuce & greens
turnips
swiss chard


STIR FRY VEGETABLES WITH WINE

1/4 c. oil (use oil appropriate to stir fry)
1/2 tsp. salt
4 c. Your favorite vegetables
1 c. onions/scallions
1/2 c. dry riesling or rice wine
3 tbsp. soy sauce or to taste

Heat oil in wok or deep fry pan add salt and all vegetables and stir frequently. Add soy sauce and wine; continue to stir and then add water. Stir frequently. Cover 2-3 minutes until vegetables are desired consistency. Serve over rice.

carrots, collards, kale, recipe community, recipe ideas, recipes, spinach, vitamin green

Recipe Sharing Community Forum


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Hi ya’ll! I hope everyone is having a fun and safe Monday afternoon. I am getting quite a bit of work done for classes, but became distracted by the thought of posting this request – which is basically to ask those of you who have made tasty treats with Ben’s Produce to please share your recipes or ideas with us. If you are interested in sharing, please post your recipe/ideas as a comment here or send an e-mail my way (parker.patricia@gmail.com). I will compile the recipes and share them in a blog post. If your recipes come from a source other than youself, please include that as well (if you know it). As usual, thanks for stopping by! We’ll see you all later this week. 
Here’s one from Rachel Ray. Ingredients from Ben’s Produce include: kale and carrots (you can add collards instead of or in addition to the parsnips): 
Mustard-Molasses Chicken One Pot

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 8 pieces bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 large onion, quartered lengthwise, then sliced
  • 3 parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-3 1-inch-long sticks, 1/2-inch wide
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and cut into sticks
  • 1 small bundle black kale or dinosaur kale, chopped or thinly sliced
  • Freshly grated nutmeg (about 1/4 teaspoon)
  • 1/4 cup grainy Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • Crusty bread with nuts and raisins or cranberries
Preparation

Heat 1 tablespoon EVOO in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season the chicken with salt and pepper, then brown until golden, 3-4 minutes on each side. Remove the chicken and add another tablespoon of EVOO to the pan, one turn of the pan.
Add the onion, parsnips and carrots and season with salt and pepper. Cook to soften a bit, 5-6 minutes. Add the kale to the pot and wilt in, then add the nutmeg.

Whisk the mustard, molasses and stock together in a bowl, then pour over top of the vegetables and settle the chicken back into the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes.
Remove the lid, then remove the chicken and reserve on a plate covered with aluminum foil. Continue simmering the veggies until the liquids are thickened, about 10 minutes.

Serve the chicken and veggies with crusty warm bread.

Source: http://www.rachaelray.com/recipe.php?recipe_id=3129

And here’s one from Southern Cooking that uses collard greens. To make this dish vegetarian, substitute vegetable broth (or vegetable bouillon) for chicken stock and leave out the bacon. Toasted pine nuts might be a good substitute for bacon…

 Collard Green Risotto and Pot Liquor

Ingredients

  • 1  tablespoon  olive oil
  • 3  bacon slices, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1  large onion, chopped
  • 2  garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1  pound  fresh collard greens, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/4  teaspoon  salt
  • 1/4  teaspoon  pepper
  • 3  cups  chicken broth
  • 1/4  cup  molasses
  • 2  tablespoons  butter or margarine
  • Risotto

Preparation

Heat oil in a Dutch oven; add bacon, and cook until crisp. Add onion, and sauté 5 to 7 minutes or until tender. Add garlic; sauté 1 minute.
Stir in collard greens, salt, and pepper; sauté over medium heat 5 minutes or until greens wilt. Stir in chicken broth. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and cook mixture 45 minutes or until greens are tender.
Pour greens mixture through a wire-mesh strainer into a container, reserving greens and pot liquor. Whisk molasses and butter into pot liquor.
Stir greens into Risotto.
Place 1 cup Collard Green Risotto in each of 6 bowls. Ladle pot liquor mixture evenly on top. Serve immediately.

Chef Jan Birnbaum, Chef Jan Birnbaum, Southern Living, JUNE 2001

Source: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=258429

This recipe was originally taken from one of the Moosewood cookbooks. If you’re not familiar with these books and you would like to add more veggies into your diet, I strongly suggest checking them out at one of our local bookstores. This recipe calls for spinach, but you could just as likely use tender kale or vitamin green instead.

Sesame Tofu with Spinach (or Vitamin Green)
 

Ingredients

Directions

  1. 1

    Slice the Tofu lengthwise into 4 rectangular slabs, than half each piece to get squares.

  2. 2

    Spread the sesame seeds on a plate. Press all surfaces of each tofu square into the seeds to coat.

  3. 3

    Heat the sesame oil in a large skillet on medium heat.

  4. 4

    Arrange the tofu in a single layer and cook about 5 minutes Carefully turn and cook 5 minutes on other side.

  5. 5

    Add soy sauce and Tabasco, turn the squares over, and cook another minute. Transfer squares to a plate (leaving stray seeds in the pan).

  6. 6

    Add the oil and garlic to the pan and sauté for about 30 seconds, until golden. Add the still damp rinsed spinach and cook for 1-2 more minutes, stirring constantly. Cook until wilted but still bright green.

  7. 7

    Season to taste with salt & pepper.

  8. 8

    Serve the tofu on top of the spinach.

Source: http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/gallery.php?rid=225814

beet and feta salad, beet rosti with rosemary, recipe ideas, recipes, roasted root veggies, tofu pot pie, vegetarian cabbage rolls, wine and honey-glazed brussel sprouts

Food Glorious Food!


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Before Ben started farming full-time, there were a TON of foods I’d never tried or cooked. While I’d had beets in my life, I’d always had them straight out of the can. The only way I ever ate them was from the can, with chopped raw onion and vinaigrette dressing. It’s yummy – but I had no idea how much better FRESH beets were. I also had no idea how potent they are – in flavor as much as in color. One of the first good things to know about preparing beets is how to wash them. When you wash them, you want to be delicate with them. If you use a brush, you will puncture the skin and the gorgeous color will bleed. I wash them thoroughly with my hands under running water and that does just fine for me. They’re organic, so I’m not that concerned about cleaning them, I just want them to be dirt free. 
I thought I’d include some of my favorite beet recipes and other recipes I’d like to try soon. Soooooo…here we go with the beets and more! NOTE: As you look over these recipes, by all means, feel free to modify them. One reason Ben is the baker and I’m the dinner cook is because I sort of improv what we have in the fridge with recipes that sound good while Ben actually follows the directions – I’ve never really been good with that – at least not when it comes to cooking :0). Experimenting with food is FUN – I hope these recipes give you some ideas and a happy party in your tummies. 
 
Roasted Beet and Feta Salad
Ingredients:  
6 small beets, scrubbed but unpeeled
2 tbsp olive oil
salt and freshly ground black petter
1 red onion, thinly sliced
4 oz arugula
4oz feta cheese, cubed (or crumbled)
2 tbsp chopped mint
For the dressing
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp honey
3 tbsp olive oil
Directions: 
Prepare ahead the roasted beets and dressing can be refrigerated separately for up to 1 day before combining. 
1. Preheat over to 400F (200C). Place the beets in a roasting pan. Add 1/2 cup water and drizzle with the oil. Season with salt and pepper. Cover the pan with aluminum foil. Roast about 1 3/4 hours, or until tender. 
2. Uncover the beets and let cool. Peel and dice the beets (NOTE: peeling beets is more an aesthetic thing than a necessity – I keep the peels on [especially when they are baby beets]). 
3. Whisk the vinegar, mustard and honey together in a small bowl, then whisk in the oil. Combine the beets, onions, and dressing in a bowl and toss. Sprinkle the arugula, feta, and mint over the top. Toss gently, and season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately. 
– Good with grilled lamb or steak, or on its own as a light lunch. 
Variation: Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Salad. Substitute a firm, crumbly goat cheese for the feta. Scatter the salad with 1/4 cup pomegranate seeds or toasted pine nuts. 
Source: The Illustrated Kitchen Bible: 1,000 Recipes from Around the World
 
Roasted Root Vegetables
Ingredients: 
6-8 baby beets (or 2-3 large beets), cut into bite size pieces
8-12 slender carrots, trimmed and peeled
2-3 small sweet potatoes or 1 large sweet potatoe, chopped into bite size pieces
1 onion, cut into quarters (or eighths – depending on how much you like onion)
1 large parsnip
1 whole head garlic, peeled and separated into cloves (or use less if you don’t like garlic a lot)
 – – – you can also add 1 kohlrabi bulb, 1 celery root

2 or 3 sprigs fresh rosemary, sage, or thyme
salt and freshly ground pepper
olive oil

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
Put all the vegetables and the herb sprigs in a large baking dish. Season well with salt and black pepper, drizzle generously with olive oil, and toss them with your hands to coat them evenly.
Put the baking dish in the preheated oven and cook, stirring the vegetables occasionally, until they are tender and golden brown, about 45 minutes. Serve the vegetables from their baking dish or transfer them to a platter to accompany a roasted main course.

Source: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/wolfgang-puck/roasted-root-vegetable-medley-recipe/index.html

 
Tofu Pot Pie
Ingredients: 
2-crust pie (bought or homemade); you could also use a frozen bought pie crust unbaked
1 lb tofu, extra firm, diced into pieces
1 large potato (any kind you like – sweet potato would be good)
4-5 chopped carrots (unpeeled is fine)
1 small onion, diced
1 leek, sliced thin
1 cup broccoli florets
salt and pepper to taste
optional: any other vegetables desired! put in what you have (as long as the veggies together make sense). We’ve made pot pie with baby beets before – it was yummy :).
Liquid: 
1/2 cup canola oil (or any you prefer)
1/2 cup water
2-3 tbsp nutritional yeast
2 tbsp tamari sauce (or Bragg’s)
Directions: 
Mix the vegetables together and place in bottom of pie crust. Combine oil, water, tamari, nutritional yeast and pour over vegetables then put top crust on. 
Back at 375 for 45 minutes or until the filling is bubbling and the crust is golden.
Source: recipe submitted to Community Cuisine: Franklin Community Cooperative’s Cookbook by Faith Dickhaut Kindness

Vegetarian Cabbage Rolls
For the filling: 
1 tbsp olive oil, plus more for the dish
1 leek, chopped
4 oz. mushrooms (your favorite), minced
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 cups bread crumbs
1 large egg
2 tbsp chopped parsley
1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
pinch of ground coriander
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 head cabbage (your choice; the bigger the leaves, the bigger the rolls)
2/3 cups vegetable stock
1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups canned crushed tomatoes
Directions: 
1. To make the filling, heat the oil in a frying pan over medium-low heat. Add the leek, mushrooms, and celery and cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, until softened. 
2. Remove from the heat and stir in the bread crumbs, egg, parsley, lemon juice, and ground coriander. Season with salt and pepper.
3. Preheat the oven to 325F (160C). Oil a 13x9in (33x23cm) baking dish. Cook the cabbage leaves in boiling water for 2 minutes, until pliable. Drain and rinse under cold water. Pat dry. 
4. Lay each leaf flat and divide the stuffing among the leaves. Roll up each leaf, folding in the sides to enclose the filling in a neat parcel. Place the rolls, seam side down, in the dish. Pour in the stock. Back for 45-55 minutes, until teander. 
5. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes, until softened. Stir in the crushed tomatoes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer about 10 minutes, or until lightly thickened. Season with salt and pepper. 
6. Using a slotted spoon, serve the cabbage rolls on diner plates, with the remaining tomato sauce passed on the side. 
Good with crusty bread, sauteed potatoes, or brown rice.
Source: The Illustrated Kitchen Bible: 1,000 Family Recipes from Around the World

Wine and Honey-Glazed Brussel Sprouts
2 points brussel sprouts
1/2 cup dry red wine
3 tbsp honey
1 1/2 tbsp natural soy sauce (or Bragg’s or tamari – depending on what you have)
2 tbsp margarine (or butter)
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tsp cornstarch
Directions: 
1. Trim the stems from the brussel sprouts and cut and X into the base, about 1/4 inch deep. 
2. In a small bowl, combine the wine, honey and soy sauce and stir together.  
3. Over moderate heat, melt the margarine in a 3-quart saucepan. Add the wine and honey mixture, the water, and the brussel sprouts. Stir together, then cook, covered, at a gentle simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionaly, for another 10 minutes. 
4. Dissolve the cornstarch in a small amount of water. Stir into the saucepan quickly, then cook for another 5 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to a covered casserole dish to serve. 
Source: Vegetarian Celebrations: Menus for Holidays and Other Festive Occasions

Beet Rosti with Rosemary
(kind of like a beet version of potato pancakes)
Keep the heat moderate — cooking too quickly will burn the sugary outside of the pancake while leaving the inside raw. And don’t forget to wear an apron when you’re grating the beets.
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds beets (3 very large or 4 to 6 medium)
  • 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Minced parsley or a few rosemary leaves for garnish
Method
  • 1. Trim beets, and peel them as you would potatoes; grate them in food processor or by hand. Begin preheating 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat.
  • 2. Toss grated beets in bowl with rosemary, salt and pepper. Add about half the flour; toss well, add rest of flour, and toss again.
  • 3. Put butter in skillet; heat until it begins to turn nut-brown. Scrape beet mixture into skillet, and press with spatula to form a round. With medium to medium-high heat — the pancake should gently sizzle — cook, shaking pan occasionally, until bottom of cake is nicely crisp, 8 to 10 minutes. Slide cake onto a plate, top with another plate, invert the two plates, and return cake to pan. Keep cooking, adjusting heat if necessary, until other side is browned, another 10 minutes or so. Garnish, cut into wedges, and serve hot or at room temperature.

Source: http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/05/02/recipe-of-the-day-beet-rosti-with-rosemary/

 
Drunken Pasta with Beets and Swiss Chard 
(you could also use kale or collards – collards take a little longer to cook than chard)
Vitamin Greens would work great as a substitute as well and be sure to use the beet greens! They taste SO good :0)

Yields: 4 servings


Ingredients

  • 1 large bottle of red wine or 2 regular size (750 ml) bottles
  • 1 box spaghetti
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 4 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 large red beet, peeled and grated on a box grater*
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 bunch of red swiss chard, leaves torn from the tough stem and shredded
  • 1/3 pound ricotta salata cheese, crumbled

Preparation

Place a large pot over high heat and add the wine. Fill the rest of the pot with water about 1/2-3/4 of the way up the sides. Bring to a boil, add some salt and the pasta. Cook pasta until al dente according to the instructions on the box. Reserve 1-2 cups of the cooking liquid when you drain it.
Step While the pasta is cooking, place a large skillet over medium-high heat with the EVOO. Add the garlic and the grated beet, season with a pinch of nutmeg, salt and pepper, and cook for 2-3 minutes.
Step Add the swiss chard to the pan and cook for about 4-5 minutes or until it starts to wilt down.
Step Add the drained pasta to the skillet, season with salt and pepper and toss it around to combine. Add some of the reserved pasta water if you like the sauce more loose. Crumble the ricotta salata on top and serve.

Source: http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/recipes/drunken-pasta-with-beets-swiss-chard/

Spinach and Kale Turnovers

In addition to being tasty, kale is a good source of lutein, benefiting eye health, and vitamins A and C. Serve as a side dish with steak or roast chicken, or enjoy two turnovers as a meatless entrée. They are great made ahead and brown-bagged; reheat in a microwave or toaster oven.


2 teaspoons olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
1 garlic clove, chopped
3 cups chopped kale (about 1 small bunch)
1 (6-ounce) package fresh baby spinach
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3/4 cup (3 ounces) crumbled feta cheese
1 (11.3-ounce) can refrigerated dinner roll dough (such as Pillsbury)
Cooking spray
2 1/2 tablespoons grated fresh Parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 375°.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 10 minutes or until tender and lightly browned. Add garlic; sauté 2 minutes. Add kale and spinach; sauté 8 minutes or until kale is tender. Stir in pepper, salt, and nutmeg. Remove from heat; cool slightly. Stir in feta.
Separate dough into 8 pieces. Roll each dough piece into a 5-inch circle. Spoon about 1/3 cup kale mixture on half of each circle, leaving a 1/2-inch border. Fold dough over kale mixture until edges almost meet. Bring bottom edge of dough over top edge; crimp edges of dough with fingers to form a rim.
Place turnovers on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Lightly coat turnovers with cooking spray; sprinkle each turnover with about 1 teaspoon Parmesan. Bake at 375° for 18 minutes or until golden brown. Let stand at least 5 minutes before serving; serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield:  8 servings (serving size: 1 turnover)

CALORIES 184 (27% from fat); FAT 5.5g (sat 2g,mono 1.6g,poly 1.2g); IRON 2.3mg; CHOLESTEROL 7mg; CALCIUM 110mg; CARBOHYDRATE 25.4g; SODIUM 516mg; PROTEIN 8.1g; FIBER 2.7g

Cooking Light, JANUARY 2007

Source: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1571423

Vegetarian Potstickers

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound firm tofu
  • 1/2 cup finely shredded carrot
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped bok choy (or tat soi)
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped water chestnuts
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped bamboo shoots
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped garlic chives
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 package potsticker or gyoza wrappers
  • 2 tablespoons oil for frying the dumplings

Preparation:

Drain the tofu, cut into cubes and mash. Wash and prepare the vegetables. Combine the tofu with the remainder of the ingredients and seasonings.

Lay out one of the gyoza wrappers in front of you. Dip your finger in the water and moisten the edges of the wrapper.

Place a heaping teaspoon of filling in the middle of the wrapper.

Fold the gyoza wrapper over the filling and pinch the edges to seal it shut. (You may want to use a cornstarch/water mixture to make this easier).

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet or wok.When oil is ready, carefully add the dumplings and cook on high heat until golden brown (about 1 minute). Without turning the dumplings over, add 1/2 cup of water and cover. Cook for about 1 minute to cook the raw filling and then uncover and continue cooking until most of the liquid is absorbed.

Serve the potstickers with the burnt side on top, with potsticker dipping sauce or soy sauce mixed with minced ginger for dipping.

 

Source: http://chinesefood.about.com/od/vegetarianrecipes/r/vegpotstickers.htm

 
Bok Choi Chicken Soup
This easy Chinese recipe allows you to get all the nutritional benefits of bok choy in a simple, flavorful soup. Feel free to increase the nutritional value by using homemade chicken broth, or adding cooked chicken or raw, peeled shrimp.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 10 leaves bok choy, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled, chopped

Preparation:

Bring the chicken broth to boil in a medium saucepan. Stir in the seasonings (the red pepper flakes, soy sauce, Asian sesame oil), and the chopped garlic.

Add the bok choy. Simmer for up to 10 minutes, until the bok choy leaves turn dark green and are wilted and tender. Serves 4 to 5.

This recipe is submitted by a reader, Linnie Williams.

Source: http://chinesefood.about.com/od/chinesesouprecipes/r/bok-choy-soup.htm