greens, online store, produce stand

It’s not easy being green…Greens, greens and more greens! YUM


Hi all! It’s another beautiful Friday in October. We’re looking forward to the next two Music on the Porch Friday’s, but we are sad that it will be over so soon. It’s been an awesome season and we’re so thankful we talked to Guy way back in August and were provided this awesome opportunity to offer ya’ll vegetables every Friday. Guy, Will, Wei, and all of you have made this such an awesome experience. Thank you so much for your support, your questions, conversations, and company! As Ben stated in our last blog, we are working on getting an online store up and running so that hopefully there will be no break in your ability to get fresh veggies close to home. We live on Sasser Street and will have a weekly pickup outside our home for anyone that’s interested.

Until then, of course, we will be coming to the last two events. Today we will offer the following produce items:

– Lettuce (summer crisp and bib)
– Swiss chard
– Green onions
– Chinese cabbage
– Tatsoi
– Bok choi
– Mixed greens
– Radishes
– Kale
– Collards
– Turnips and greens
– Mustard greens
– Broccoli
– Black cherry tomatoes
– Roma tomatoes
– Sweet potatoes

We’ve been eating gorgeous salads with all the stuff listed above and we’ve also been eating the heck out of greens. It might not be easy being green, but it sure is easy to eat those yummy and nutritious greens.

This is how we like to cook our greens (collards, turnips, kale and more):
1) Start by peeling and chopping garlic and onions and browning them on medium heat in olive oil (Ben likes to use bacon fat) in the pan (i like big honkin chunks of garlic and onion – when Ben makes his greens, the pieces are usually smaller – cut these to taste).
2) Add about one cup of water to the garlic and onions. this is when you add your seasonings. I like to use vegetable/vegetarian bullion (a half piece or a whole piece depending on how many greens I’m making), a little bit of crushed red pepper, and just a small shot of Bragg’s (or low sodium soy sauce, if we’re out of Bragg’s).
3) Rinse your greens and start tearing them up in whatever size pieces you like and put them in the pan as you do. I do this fairly quickly and haphazardly. Sometimes I include parts of the stalk if they’re not woody. If they’re woody, leave them out. I also like to add a splash of vinegar. You could substitute this for a vinegar based hot sauce if you like spicy foods. Cook the greens until they are wilted and voila, you have delicious greens to eat with rice, on the side with burgers, with shrimps and cheesy grits, and almost anything else really :0).

Thanks for stopping by!

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